UYUNI
AMOUNT OF SALT11 BILLION TONS
SALT FLATS USED BY NASA TOPOSITION SATELLITES
# OF BIRD SPECIES80
The gateway to the world’s largest salt flats, Uyuni is the chosen destination for many who want to explore this natural phenomenon. As it has grown as a tourist destination for this reason, Uyuni increasingly caters to those looking for local culture and flavor. In the city itself, you can find numerous street vendors, shops and artisans. The town also has one of the largest street markets in the area.
The salt flats themselves however will always be the primary draw in Uyuni. Thought to have been created as a result of the evaporation and transformation of prehistoric lakes, the flats span up to 80 miles across. After it rains, it serves in essence as a gigantic mirror—truly a sight not to be missed.
  • PLANT AND ANIMAL LIFE

    While given the nature of the salt flats, vegetation and wildlife are not necessarily plentiful, there are certain exotic/rare species that can be found around the salt flats. These include: South American flamingos, the Andean fox as well as giant cacti.

  • UYUNI TRAIN CEMETERY

    Beyond the salt flats, a popular attraction is also the train cemetery. Mostly used by mining companies, the trains largely stopped running in the 1940s. Left just sitting there and thus abandoned, the trains ultimately became known as a cemetery of sorts.

  • MUSEUMS

    For a smaller town, Uyuni has a few museums certainly worth checking out. One such venue: Museo Arqueología y Antropológico de los Andes Meridionales actually features mummies and numerous fossils. While the train museum offers glimpses of the region’s mining past.