KENAI FJORDS NATIONAL PARK
ANNUAL VISITORS350,000
HIGHEST ELEVATIONMT. TRUULI (6,611')
SIZE700,000 ACRES
This park lies at the end of the Kenai Peninsula, and is comprised of 40 glaciers flowing from Harding Icefield. The only one accessible by road, offshore is Exit Glacier, an actual active glacier that visitors can hike through and explore. Most who come to Kenai Fjords get to see the area primarily by boat as this is largely the only way to experience many of the sights.
The small town of Seward is where tourists start from as they schedule a boat tour to take them into Kenai Fjords. During such a journey it is not uncommon to spot tons of bird species, along with sea otters, sea lions, and of course the humpback whales which are common in the area.
  • HARDING ICEFIELD TRAIL

    An approximate 8-mile hike, the Harding Icefield Tail is not for the faint of heart. With every mile, you gain 1,000 feet of elevation. It is a beautiful journey though. From the top, the view of the icefield is indescribable. Bears are commonly sighted along the way.

  • BEAR GLACIER LAGOON

    A great place to spot giant icebergs, the lagoon is a water formation between two glaciers. It is a very popular destination for kayakers and paddleboarders. This however is not a water route for novices; there are water taxis available to take those less experienced through the lagoon.

  • SNOW ACTIVITIES

    Given the climate and landscape, Kenai is a haven for snowmobilers, cross country skiers, and dog mushers. The terrain is an adventure when it comes to exploring.

THE WEATHER
  • Winter can be a fun time to play outside in the snow. The park is open, but the services and roads are shut down.

  • Late spring (June) can be a great month to visit. It is still on the early side of the busy season. The weather is dry and mild.

  • Summers are the busy season. The days are long and the weather is mild. It is the dry season and highs are in the low-60s.

  • Fall is the wet season and the area gets about 10 inches of rain per month.