TOP 10 NATIONAL PARKS IN ALASKA
Alaska is prized with tying California as the state with the most national parks in the United States: eight. While that’s a couple short of the ten required for this list, we have a couple of honorable mentions that are still worth the visit.
 
10.
KOBUK VALLEY NATIONAL PARK

Kobuk Valley National Park is located up north; like, way up north. Located north of the Arctic Circle, Kobuk Valley has some fascinating and intriguing landscape. For instance, the largest active sand dunes in the Arctic are here. And if you’re looking to spot caribou in the wild you have a chance south of Kabuk Valley, but the herd migrate through this national park so your chance to see a sizable herd are strong.

9.
LAKE CLARK NATIONAL PARK

Bristol Bay is a huge ecosystem with a famous group of residents that, therefore, impact the food chain all the way up to bears and humans alike. Lake Clark and the streams that feed it and feed from it contribute a great deal to Bristol Bay’s salmon fishery, so its nutrients and conservation is utterly important. The namesake lake itself is picturesque with small, bush-laden island throughout, and a backdrop of snow-topped peaks.

8.
BERING LAND BRIDGE NATIONAL PRESERVE

As one of the most remote locations in the United States, the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, located on Seward Peninsula, is also rarely visited. The history of the area is astounding with humans estimated to have crossed from Asia to North America over the Bering Land Bridge around 20,000 years ago! Travel here is limited at best, with small aircraft or walking your only options to get in. Once in, however, snowmobiling is possible while other motorized vehicles are prohibited.

7.
ALEUTIAN ISLANDS

The Aleutian Islands are that line of islands reach west from the far coasts of Alaska towards Asia. They are rarely visited, but gorgeous nonetheless. Additionally, there is a storied World War II history in the area so be sure to make time for the Aleutian World War II National Historic Area during your expedition in the northern Pacific.

6.
WRANGEL – ST. ELIAS NATIONAL PARK

Whether you’re looking to get some crazy altitude sickness or cure it Wrangel St. Elias National Park can accommodate both. This national park stretches from the ocean coast (sea level) to the mountains reaching as high as 18,000 feet! That’s not all, this is also the largest national park in the world, by a wide margin; by about a million acres to the spot in second, which just so happens to be Gates to the Arctic in Alaska.

5.
KENAI FJORDS NATIONAL PARK

At around a 3hr drive from Anchorage, Kenai Fjords National Park may be the most accessible national park for out of towners. While getting there is relatively easy, adequately exploring it takes much more planning and means of transportation. Find a boat, and consider a sea kayak to really explore the inlets and fjords to take them in.

4.
GATES OF THE ARCTIC NATIONAL PARK

Gates of the Arctic is the northernmost National Park in the United States so you’re likely to witness landscape and an ecosystem unlike any other in the country. The park is huge (bigger than the country of Belgium) so you’d be hard pressed to see it all, but what you will see will blow your mind. Home to a number of exciting animals such as polar bears, grizzlies, and wolverines.

3.
GLACIER BAY NATIONAL PARK

Glacier Bay is home to several glaciers and, therefore, is destined to dissipate over time. Sadly, thanks to climate change, it has been happening at an alarming rate. Its location is convenient to leisure cruisers as it’s just on the northern side of the Inside Passage, where most Alaskan cruises venture. Experience the awe of these massive moving “landmasses” in person.

2.
KATMAI NATIONAL PARK

Katmai is filled with streams, rivers, forests, and the main tourist draw: brown bears. Brown bears, or grizzlies, are abundant in this area leading to unbelievable close encounters with the huge animals. The “salmon run” at Brooks Falls is the perfect location to see several bears, thought if you’re not staying at the popular Brooks Falls Lodge you’ll likely be fighting for viewing space with day-trippers.

1.
DENALI NATIONAL PARK

Formerly Mount McKinley National Park, Denali had a name-change back in 1975 to commemorate the local indigenous people the Koyukon. Denali is translated to “the high one” which is incredibly appropriate seeing as it’s the highest mountain on the continent and second highest mountain outside of Asia (Asia and the Middle East claim the first 100+ highest mountains in the world). Denali is a sight to see and a rare one at that as the peak is only visible to about of a third of its visitors due to cloud cover most days.

VEBO NATIONAL PARKS EXPERIENCES IN ALASKA